2017 Prix TD and Prix Harry Black Winners Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Montreal (November 9, 2017) — The Canadian Children’s Book Centre (CCBC) is thrilled to announce the winners of the 13th annual Prix TD de littérature canadienne pour l’enfance et la jeunesse, for the most distinguished French-language book of the year, and the inaugural Prix Harry Black de l’album jeunesse, for the best French-language picture book:

Prix TD de littérature canadienne pour l’enfance et la jeunesse ($30,000)
Sponsored by TD Bank Group

Même pas vrai

Même pas vrai
Written by Larry Tremblay (Montreal, QC)
Illustrated by Guillaume Perreault (Gatineau, QC)
Éditions de la Bagnole

Prix Harry Black de l’album jeunesse ($5,000)
Sponsored by Mary Macchiusi

 Au-dela de la forêt

Au-delà de la forêt
Written by Nadine Robert (Varennes, QC)
Illustrated by Gérard DuBois (St-Lambert, QC)
Comme des géants

The announcement was made at a gala event last night at Le Windsor, where Quebec children’s literary elite were on hand to applaud the winners. In addition to the $30,000 prize shared by Tremblay and Perreault, their publisher, Éditions de la Bagnole, will be awarded $2,500 to promote the winning book. The remaining four finalists of the Prix TD will share a $10,000 prize. Click here to see the nominees and juries for both the Prix TD and the Prix Harry Black.

The winner of this year’s French-language Fan Choice Award, presented by Radio-Canada, was Aaah!bécédaire, written by Elaine Turgeon (Montreal, QC) and illustrated by Martin Laliberté (Montreal, QC). Young readers were invited to choose their favourite book from the titles shortlisted for the Prix TD de littérature canadienne pour l’enfance et la jeunesse.

On November 21, the CCBC will present the winners of its six other book awards: the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award, the Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award, the Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, the Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People, the John Spray Mystery Award, and the Amy Mathers Teen Book Award.

For more information, please contact:

Camilia Kahrizi
Marketing and Website Coordinator
The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
416.975.0010 ext. 221 | camilia@bookcentre.ca

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Grade One Students Wake up to Good Morning, Canada

Grade 1 students from coast-to-coast will be cheering Good Morning, Canada, as TD and the Canadian Children’s Book Centre kicks off the 18th annual TD Grade One Book Giveaway this October. As Canada’s largest free book distribution program for school-aged children, more than 550,000 special edition copies of Good Morning, Canada by Andrea Lynn Beck will be distributed to Grade 1 students nationwide. To bring the story to life, Beck will also take part in book readings at schools in Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary.

“I’m thrilled to share Good Morning, Canada with young readers from coast to coast as part of the TD Grade One Book Giveaway,” said Andrea Lynn Beck, author and illustrator. “The book explores many of the symbols of Canada that we know and love, like hockey, snow and Mounties “in a row” — and we’ve added extra information just for our grade one readers!”

Celebrating the beauty of Canada through bright illustrations and cheerful, rhyming text, Good Morning, Canada introduces children to unique landscapes and iconic symbols from across the country. The inviting pages capture a familiar Canada that will delight young readers.

“Getting lost in a good book is one of the greatest joys of childhood and we are proud to be part of this experience for every grade one student across Canada,” said Frank McKenna, Deputy Chair, TD Bank Group. “At TD we understand the importance reading plays from an early age, which is why we are committed to supporting children’s literacy in Canada.”

TD Grade One Book Giveaway is funded by TD Bank Group and coordinated by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre. Since the program began in 2000, over 9 million books have been given away to Grade 1 students across the country.

“Developing a lifelong love of reading and a passion for books starts by getting more books into the hands of children,” said Charlotte Teeple, Executive Director, Canadian Children’s Book Centre. “This year we are excited to honour Canada’s 150th birthday with a truly Canadian book such as Good Morning, Canada.”

For more information, visit TDReads.com and bookcentre.ca.

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s So You Want to Get Published! Seminar

What does it take to get a children’s book published? What are children’s book publishers looking for? How do booksellers pick the books they sell and where do they see gaps in the market? Let our panel of experts show you what you need to do to get your manuscript published!

Panelists will include industry professionals such as Kathy Lowinger, former publisher of Tundra Books; Gail Winskill, publisher of Pajama Press; Heather Kuipers, owner of Ella Minnow Children’s Bookstore; Joel A. Sutherland, author; and Rebecca Bender, author & illustrator, and art director at Pajama Press.

“I attended this seminar and it was a great chance to be surrounded by professionals in the industry and get real answers and insights. The Book Centre is an excellent connector, and the opportunity to get exposure with publishers, editors, and other writers is inspiring.” —Lucy Leiderman, author of the Seven Wanderers Trilogy

WHEN:
Saturday, November 4, 2017
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

WHERE:
Room 200, Northern District Library
40 Orchard View Blvd., Toronto ON M4R 1B9

COST:
$100.00. Registration is limited.
Each participant will receive a copy of the CCBC’s bestsellling guide, Get Published! The Writing for Children Kit.

Reserve your spot today!

GGBooks 2017 Finalists Revealed

The Canada Council for the Arts has announced the 2017 finalists for the Governor General’s Literary Awards. GGBooks is one of Canada’s longest-standing literary awards, and is among the country’s most diverse awards programs – honouring works in seven categories and two official languages.

“The announcement of the finalists for the Governor General’s Literary Awards is always an enticing and powerful invitation to discovery through reading because the bold choice of topics and literary approaches, together with evocative illustrations and dazzling translations, attract, delight and entrance all kinds of readers,” said Canada Council Director and CEO Simon Brault. “Our culture depends on our literature, which does us proud around the world.”

Founded in 1936, the Governor General’s Literary Awards are one of Canada’s oldest and most prestigious literary awards program with a total value of $450,000. The Canada Council for the Arts has funded, administered and promoted the awards since 1959.

GGBooks finalists are chosen by peer assessment committees per category, per language (7 in English and 7 in French), who consider eligible books published between September 1, 2016 and September 30, 2017 for English-language books and between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017 for French-language books.

Each winner receives $25,000. The publisher of each winning book receives $3,000 to support promotional activities. Non-winning finalists each receive $1,000.

Over their 81 years, the Governor General’s Literary Awards have celebrated more than 700 works by over 500 authors, poets, playwrights, translators and illustrators.

Below are the shortlists for the children’s categories:

English-language finalists

Young People’s Literature (Text):

  • Everything Beautiful is Not Ruined – Danielle Younge-Ullman (Toronto)
    Razorbill / Penguin Canada Books
  • Hit the Ground Running – Alison Hughes (Edmonton, Alta.)
    Orca Books Publishers
  • The Marrow Thieves – Cherie Dimaline (Toronto)
    Dancing Cat Books / Cormorant Books
  • The Way Back Home – Allan Stratton (Toronto)
    Scholastic Canada
  • Those Who Run in the Sky – Aviaq Johnston (Iqaluit, Nunavut)
    Inhabit Media

Young People’s Literature (Illustrated Books):

  • Short Stories for Little Monsters – Marie-Louise Gay (Montreal)
    Groundwood Books
  • The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk – Jan Thornhill (Havelock, Ont.)
    Groundwood Books
  • Town Is by the Sea – Joanne Schwartz / Sydney Smith (Toronto / Toronto)
    Groundwood Books
  • When the Moon Comes – Paul Harbridge / Matt James (Toronto /Toronto)
    Tundra Books / Penguin Random House Canada
  • When We Were Alone – David Alexander Robertson / Julie Flett (Winnipeg / Vancouver)
    HighWater Press

French-language finalists

Young People’s Literature (Text):

  • Chroniques post-apocalyptiques d’une enfant sage – Annie Bacon (Montreal)
    Bayard Canada
  • L’élixir du baron Von Rezine – K. Lambert (Montreal)
    Éditions Pierre Tisseyre
  • Les moustiques – Jocelyn Boisvert (Havre-aux-Maisons, Que.)
    Soulières éditeur
  • L’importance de Mathilde Poisson – Véronique Drouin (Sherbrooke, Que.)
    Bayard Canada
  • Moi qui marche à tâtons dans ma jeunesse noire – Roxane Desjardins (Montreal)
    Les Herbes rouges

Young People’s Literature (Illustrated Books):

  • Azadah – Jacques Goldstyn (Montreal)
    Les Éditions de la Pastèque
  • En voiture! L’Amérique en chemin de fer – Pascal Blanchet (Montreal)
    Les Éditions de la Pastèque
  • Fred Petitchatminou – Christiane Duchesne / Marion Arbona (Montreal / Paris, France)
    Les Éditions de la Bagnole
  • La légende de Carcajou – Renée Robitaille / Slavka Kolesar (Montreal / Jaffray, B.C.)
    Planète rebelle
  • Louis parmi les spectres – Fanny Britt / Isabelle Arsenault (Montreal / Montreal)
    Les Éditions de la Pastèque
  • English-language peer assessment committees:

    Young People’s Literature (Text): Cheryl Foggo, Alma Fullerton, Kevin Major
    Young People’s Literature (Illustrated Books): Danielle Daniel, Robert Heidbreder, Brenda Jones

    French-language peer assessment committees:

    Young People’s Literature (Text): Sandra Dussault, Micheline Marchand, Sylvain Meunier
    Young People’s Literature (Illustrated Books): Édith Bourget, Anne-Claire Delisle, Yayo

    Dates:

    • Wednesday, November 1, 6:00 am: The full list of winners will be unveiled at http://ggbooks.ca/.
    • Wednesday, November 29, 6:00 pm, in her first official ceremony with the Canada Council, Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Governor General of Canada, will present the 2017 Governor General’s Literary Awards at Rideau Hall, in Ottawa.
    • Thursday, November 30, 11:45 am – 1:00 pm: Readers are invited to meet the English-language GGBooks winners at a public reading and book signing at the Canada Council, 150 Elgin St., Ottawa (event with French-language winners on Wednesday, November 29, 11:45 am – 1:00 pm).

    For the full list of nominees, including the adult categories, please visit ggbooks.ca.

A Guide to Self-Publishing Your Book

Every day, the Canadian Children’s Book Centre receives questions from aspiring authors who want to try self-publishing their book. In partnership with FriesenPress, we’ve created this guide to answer some of those questions and help turn literary dreams into reality.

unnamed (9)What is the difference between traditional publishing and self-publishing?

In traditional publishing, aspiring authors submit their manuscripts to publishers or literary agencies, and hope for the best. If a publisher chooses a manuscript for publication, they manage the production, printing, distributing and marketing of the book, and the author gets a percentage of the profits and possibly an advance to finance the completion of the writing.

Self-publishing offers full control to the author, who covers the costs of designing, printing and marketing the book. There are several advantages: “Self-publishing allows authors to take their book to market more quickly, allows them to retain all rights and creative control, and offers significantly higher royalties than the traditional route,” says Tammara Kennelly, President at FriesenPress.

How does self-publishing work?

In the past, self-publishing meant that authors were left to their own devices when it came to editing and designing their books, not to mention distributing and marketing them. Some platforms offered further help with production, but authors were generally left to navigate the process unassisted.

Full-service companies like FriesenPress offer a fully defined production process, provide authors with a dedicated team of vetted professionals, and deliver expert support and advice throughout the publishing process. They ensure authors have a top-quality book able to compete with the best in the marketplace.

Which self-publishing service is right for me?

unnamed (15)It’s important to do research and choose a publishing service that offers what you need, within your budget. It’s also crucial to remember that you’re not just paying to print the book—professional editing, design, and marketing are essential components to producing a successful book.

“Trying to do everything yourself in the name of saving a couple of hundred dollars can result in a poor-quality book that no one wants to buy,” says Kennelly. “Just as traditional publishers work hard to make sure each book they publish is as good as it can be, independent authors also need to be strategic. Investing your money in the right areas can pay great dividends. For example, if your budget is limited, I’d advise you focus your investment on editing and cover design.”

How do self-published authors integrate illustrations into their work?

Unlike in traditional publishing, self-published authors have the luxury of selecting and hiring their illustrators themselves, but it can be a daunting task. For picture books, it’s vital to select the right illustrations for your work—it’s what your readers see first, and people will judge your book by its cover.

Services like FriesenPress make the process easier by giving you a wide variety of illustration styles to choose from. They are also able to work with authors to help them decide which style of illustration might be best suited to their book.

unnamed (11)What advantages does a full-service company like FriesenPress offer over less comprehensive publishing services?

The publishing process at FriesenPress was built to mirror the steps of traditional publishing.

  • They offer a full spectrum of editing services, from basic proofreading to developmental editing, which can help a struggling author to advance or complete their story. They also provide content editing to fix aspects like spelling and punctuation, as well as to offer feedback on aspects like plot, character development, pacing, etc.
  • Distribution is a roadblock many self-published authors encounter. FriesenPress offers wide distribution to ensure your print book is available worldwide through up to 39,000 book retailers globally, and can distribute your eBook on Amazon, Google, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Chapters Indigo and the FriesenPress bookstore.
  • FriesenPress will also help you develop your sales and marketing plan with the support and guidance of one of their experts. You can purchase the individual components that best complement your plan, such as a website, an external book review service, a social media plan, a press release or a spot in the widely distributed FriesenPress catalogue.

I want to self-publish my book. What’s the first step I should take?

Make sure you’ve done your homework on every aspect of publishing a book, and have a plan prepared for once it’s published. Don’t rush into it—take your time with every step of the process, and make sure you’re doing it right. Thousands of books are published in Canada every year, and for your book to stand out, you want it to be of high quality and marketed well.

“I always say self-publishing is like completing a triathlon,” says Kennelly. “You need to pace yourself and be equally invested and committed at each stage to successfully finish the race. Stage one is the writing. Stage two is the production of the book. And stage three is the sales and marketing aspect. All three are equally important and equally demanding. You are an authorpreneur, embrace that and invest in the success of your book.”

FP2015_Logo Blue Visit FriesenPress.com to start your publishing journey. Mention the Canadian Children’s Book Centre and receive 10% off any publishing service package.
This post was sponsored by FriesenPress.

 

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Tour Roster Announced for TD Canadian Children’s Book Week 2018

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre is excited to announce the authors, illustrators and storytellers who will be touring for TD Canadian Children’s Book Week 2018 (May 5-12, 2018).

Visit www.bookweek.ca later this fall to find out where these creators will be touring and how you can participate!

Alex A., author/illustrator *
Montreal, QC

Mariella Bertelli, storyteller *
Toronto, ON

Lana Button, author *
Burlington, ON

Marina Cohen, author *
Markham, ON

Eileen Cook, author
North Vancouver, BC

Anne Glover, storyteller *
Victoria, BC

Darren Groth, author *
Delta, BC

Sylvia Gunnery, author
LaHave, NS

Alison Hughes, author *
Edmonton, AB

Anna Humphrey, author *
Kitchener, ON

Melanie Jackson, author *
Vancouver, BC

Jessica Scott Kerrin, author
Halifax, NS

Soyeon Kim, illustrator *
Burlington, ON

Alice Kuipers, author *
Saskatoon, SK

Shoshana Litman, storyteller
Victoria, BC

Elly MacKay, author/illustrator *
Owen Sound, ON

Stephanie Simpson McLellan, author
Newmarket, ON

Jennifer Mook-Sang, author *
Burlington, ON

Lorna Schultz Nicholson, author
Edmonton, AB

Andreas Oertel, author *
Lac du Bonnet, MB

Caroline Pignat, author
Kanata, ON

Kass Reich, illustrator *
Toronto, ON

Tom Ryan, author *
Halifax, NS

Rina Singh, author
Toronto, ON

Lori Joy Smith, author/illustrator *
Charlottetown, PE

Carey Sookocheff, author/illustrator *
Toronto, ON

Joel A. Sutherland, author
Courtice, ON

J. Torres, author *
Whitby, ON

Vikki VanSickle, author
Toronto, ON

Pam Withers, author *
Vancouver, BC

* Indicates a first-time tour participant

 

For more information, please contact:

Shannon Howe Barnes
Program Coordinator
Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Tel: 416 975-0010 x 227
shannon@bookcentre.ca

Anne Innis Dagg Wins 2016 Lane Anderson Award

Anne Innis Dagg, author of 5 Giraffes, won the Lane Anderson Award, young readers category, at a private dinner in Toronto Monday night.  The Lane Anderson Award, created by Sharon Fitzhenry and Hollister Doll in 2010, honours the very best science writing in Canada today, both in the adult and young reader categories. The winner in each category receives $10,000.

Quoting a recent CBC article, Sharon Fitzhenry said in a speech given before the dinner “43 percent of Canadians have said that science is a ‘matter of opinion.’  Both Holly and I are crazy about science books.  We are trying to expand the reach of science and hopefully make it more available for everyday Canadians.  Thank you all for contributing such wonderful books.”

Asked about what she was planning on doing with the money, author Anne Innis Dagg stated, “I’m going to give the money to Save the Giraffes, run by three people I know personally.  I’ll send it off tomorrow.”  She also said, “It’s wonderful to win this award.  You can write books, and five people will say that they read them, and you don’t know if anyone else is going to read them.  So this way it’s lovely to know that many more people are going to read them.”

This award is unique in that it recognises both adult and young reader categories.  While explaining her love of writing books for children, shortlisted author Claire Eamer said, “Children aren’t afraid of science. Adults are afraid of science.”  She went on to explain why she writes science books for children.  “I write science because I love knowing how things work, and why they work, and where they came from. I write for kids because I don’t have to be respectable, and dignified, and quiet. I can say, (with emotion) ‘this is so cool’ and they will respond the same way.”

For more information, please visit http://laneandersonaward.ca.

Annonce des finalistes du Prix TD et du Prix Harry Black 2017

Le Centre du livre jeunesse canadien est fier de vous annoncer les finalistes du Prix TD de littérature canadienne pour l’enfance et la jeunesse et le nouveau prix pour la littérature jeunesse, le Prix Harry Black de l’album jeunesse.

Le Prix Harry Black de l’album jeunesse est dédié à la mémoire de feu Monsieur Harry Black. Parmi ses nombreuses réalisations, Harry Black a été un directeur très apprécié d’UNICEF Canada. Auteur et illustrateur à part entière, il aimait les livres pour enfants et pensait que l’édition canadienne était extrêmement importante pour le pays. Il estimait que le monde de l’édition française et anglaise au Canada devait travailler ensemble de façon plus étroite. Au cours de sa carrière, M. Black a rencontré plusieurs auteurs et illustrateurs de livres jeunesse canadiens-français, dont il appréciait le travail. Afin de souligner l’importance de son travail, au nom des enfants du monde et des services rendus à sa nation, Monsieur Black a reçu l’Ordre du Canada en 2003.

Les livres en nomination que nous vous présentons ci-après sont des exemples des meilleurs auteurs et illustrateurs de langue française du Canada. Accompagné d’une bourse de 5 000 $, le Prix Harry Black est remis au meilleur album de langue française destiné aux enfants âgés de trois à huit ans.

Le Prix TD est remis au livre le plus remarquable de l’année écrit à l’intention des enfants âgés de 0 à 12 ans. Le lauréat se remportera une bourse de 30 000 $.

Les lauréats de ces prix seront divulgués à la soirée gala du Prix TD 2017, qui se tiendra le 8 novembre prochain à l’hôtel Le Windsor à Montréal.

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter :

Magda Tadros
Le Centre du livre jeunesse canadien
Tel : 514-971-0483
Adresse courriel : magdatadros12346@gmail.com


Prix TD de littérature canadienne pour l’enfance et la jeunesse (30 000 $)
Parrainé par le Groupe Banque TD

AaahBecedaire

Aaah!bécédaire
Texte : Elaine Turgeon (Montréal, QC)
Illustrations : Martin Laliberté (Montréal, QC)
Éditions Druide
À partir de 4 ans
« Un abécédaire très original qui utilise, au lieu de mots ou de phrases, des interjections classées en ordre alphabétique… Turgeon et Laliberté nous présentent, un abécédaire monstrueusement drôle, ludique et interactif au grand plaisir des enfants… Un livre d’une grande créativité et imagination! »

En voiture

En voiture! L’Amérique en chemin de fer
Texte et illustrations : Pascal Blanchet (Montréal, QC)
Éditions de la Pastèque
À partir de 8 ans
« Vos bagages sont prêts? Bien, car ce premier documentaire propose de vous faire découvrir des trains légendaires et des gares mythiques ayant marqués l’histoire à travers un voyage qui s’étend de Montréal à Los Angeles… Sur chacune des quinze villes de ce périple, l’auteur fait un commentaire anecdotique dépeignant une certaine époque ou une information historique…  Grâce à ses illustrations très élégantes et aux lignes pures, Blanchet a su créer une ambiance véritablement inspirée de l’Art déco. »

Même pas vrai

Même pas vrai
Texte : Larry Tremblay (Montréal, QC)
Illustrations : Guillaume Perreault (Gatineau, QC)
Éditions de la Bagnole
À partir de 8 ans
« Tremblay signe, avec Même pas vrai, son premier livre pour enfant… Très bien accompagné par les illustrations de Perreault, on suit la vie de Marco, « sept ans et demi avec des poussières »… à qui il n’arrive rien de spectaculaire, mais plein de ces petites choses qui construisent l’existence… Les réflexions de Marco sur tous ces évènements, sont à la fois drôles et profondes, légères et graves, enfantines et adultes et l’ensemble forme un mélange unique et savoureux. »

Niska

Niska
Texte : Étienne Poirier (Trois-Rivières, QC)
Éditions du soleil de minuit
À partir de 11 ans
« C’est dans un langage accessible à l’enfant, héroïne de l’histoire, que Poirier explique le drame de l’assimilation des autochtones dans les pensionnats de l’époque… La tendresse de l’écriture contraste avec la violence qui ressort de chacune des étapes d’acculturation de l’identité des natifs du pays… Avec une grande subtilité, l’auteur arrive à transférer l’innocence du jeune personnage vers un retentissant désenchantement. »

Y'a pas de place chez nous

Y’a pas de place chez nous
Texte : Andrée Poulin (Gatineau, QC)
Illustrations : Enzo Lord Mariano (Montréal, QC)
Éditions Québec Amérique
À partir de 8 ans
« Dans cet album, Poulin nous offre un touchant récit sur une réalité vécue par de trop nombreux enfants… Y’a pas de place chez nous met en scène deux jeunes réfugiés d’un pays inconnu cherchant une terre d’asile. De port en port, d’arrêt en arrêt, ils font face à diverses réactions : le rejet, l’indifférence, la peur… Toutefois, les deux frères, Marwan et Tarek, terminent leur quête en territoire bienveillant où ils sont accueillis et, nous le souhaitons, traités avec dignité. L’illustrateur, Enzo Lord Mariano, joue de contrastes oscillant entre d’inquiétantes couleurs sombres et des touches lumineuses porteuses d’espoir. »

MEMBRES DU JURY : Noë Crospal, animateur de lecture pour la jeunesse; Joël-Vincent Cyr, bibliothécaire; Rachel DeRoy-Ringuette, consultante en littérature pour la jeunesse; Marie France Genest, bibliothécaire; Sophie Kurler, bibliothécaire.

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Le Prix Harry Black de l’album jeunesse (5 000 $)
Parrainé par Mary Macchiusi

Au-dela de la forêt

Au-delà de la forêt
Texte : Nadine Robert (Varennes, QC)
Illustrations : Gérard DuBois (St-Lambert, QC)
Comme des géants
À partir de 5 ans
« L’écriture sobre de Robert conjuguée aux grandes illustrations au charme suranné de DuBois fait de cette histoire de détermination et de solidarité un album remarquable. Texte et illustrations mettent en relief la tendre complicité entre ce fils et son père dont la curiosité engendre un projet titanesque ainsi que l’entraide naturelle de leur communauté dans la réalisation de ce rêve. Passant d’individuelle à collective, cette quête fait réfléchir aux valeurs fondamentales et intemporelles de la vie en société. »

Azadah

Azadah
Texte et illustrations : Jacques Goldstyn (Mont-Royal, QC)
Éditions de la Pastèque
À partir de 6 ans
« Azadah est une petite fille Afghane qui se lie d’amitié avec une photographe occidentale en mission dans son pays. Révoltée par les conditions qu’on lui impose, elle rêve de littérature, de films et d’aventures vers l’ailleurs. Dans son livre, Goldstyn nous raconte avec engagement et peu de mots une histoire de rêve et d’espoirs, avec le crayon vivant et les couleurs lumineuses qu’on lui connaît. Azadah est un hommage à Anja Niedringhaus, photojournaliste assassinée en 2014 en Afghanistan. »

Je ne suis pas ta maman

Je ne suis pas ta maman
Texte et illustrations : Marianne Dubuc (Montréal, QC)
Comme des géants
À partir de 4 ans
« Une histoire d’adoption, d’acceptation des différences qui se déroule tout en douceur au fil des pages. De la peur de l’autre à son amour, un récit, très bien construit, tendre et dur à la fois. L’histoire est portée avec force par les illustrations tout en finesse de Dubuc. Variant les mises en pages, les plans et les angles de vue adoptés, elle nous plonge magnifiquement au creux de l’univers des personnages, tout en mettant en valeur leur milieu de vie. »

N'importe quoi

N’importe quoi !
Texte et illustrations : Élise Gravel (Montréal, QC)
Éditions Les 400 coups
À partir de 5 ans
« Album, carnet de croquis, histoires courtes, réflexions…  Avec N’importe quoi! Gravel invite ses lecteurs à découvrir ce qu’elle fait de son temps lorsqu’elle ne travaille pas à un projet de livres pour enfants. À la fois drôle, parfois intime, vraiment différent, ce livre a été vu par le jury comme un encouragement à la créativité, à la persévérance, voire à l’acceptation que tout n’a pas à être parfait. »

Y'a pas de place chez nous

Y’a pas de place chez nous
Texte : Andrée Poulin (Gatineau, QC)
Illustrations : Enzo Lord Mariano (Montréal, QC)
Éditions Québec Amérique
À partir de 5 ans
« Avec Y’a pas de place chez nous, la thématique des réfugiés est abordée de front, mais avec une grande sensibilité. En opposant le rejet des habitants des pays traversés à la force de la relation unissant les personnages, Poulin nous livre un texte percutant, engagé, au rythme splendide qui traite d’un sujet malheureusement d’actualité. Les illustrations évoquent quant à elles subtilement la dureté du voyage pour les enfants passagers de ce bateau de réfugiés en quête d’une terre d’accueil. »

MEMBRES DU JURY : Danièle Courchesne, enseignante; Marie Dupin de Saint-André, Rédactrice en chef, Le Pollen; Pascale Grenier, bibliothécaire, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec.


En ce qui concerne le Centre du livre jeunesse canadien

Le Centre du livre jeunesse canadien (CLJC) est un organisme national à but non lucratif et enregistré sous l’appellation de charité. C’est l’implantation du CLJC en 1976 qui a changé pour toujours le paysage de la littérature jeunesse et le monde de l’édition au Canada, en offrant la première infrastructure pancanadienne à encourager la mise en marché, la promotion, la création du livre jeunesse,  tout autant que sa diffusion et son utilisation dans les régions et partout au Canada. Le CLJC est une ressource culturelle essentielle dans tout le pays dont 5 bibliothèques régionales au Canada mises à la disposition de toute personne intéressée aux lecteurs de livres de jeunesse.

Pour plus d’information, veuillez vous référer à www.centredulivrejeunesse.ca

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Finalists Announced for the 2017 Canadian Children’s Book Centre Awards

$135,000 in prize monies to be awarded

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Toronto (September 7, 2017) – The Canadian Children’s Book Centre (CCBC) is delighted to announce the finalists for the following eight major awards for Canadian children’s books:

The nominated books exemplify some of the very best work by Canadian authors and illustrators from across the country. The winners of the English-language awards will be announced at an invitation-only gala event at The Carlu in Toronto on November 21, 2017. The winners of the French-language awards, including the inaugural Prix Harry Black de l’album jeunesse, will be announced at an invitation-only gala event at Le Windsor in Montreal on November 8, 2017. Overall, $135,000 in prize monies will be awarded.

This year, TD Bank Group and the Canadian Children’s Book Centre are once again partnering with CBC/Radio-Canada to present the Fan Choice Award/Choix du public littérature jeunesse. Young readers are invited to choose their favourite book from the titles shortlisted for the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award and the Prix TD de littérature canadienne pour l’enfance et la jeunesse. The awards will be presented to the winning authors at the Toronto and Montreal galas.

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre is proud to share these nominated titles and the juries’ notes with you. The finalists for each award are listed below.

For more information, please contact:

Camilia Kahrizi
Marketing and Website Coordinator
The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Tel: 416.975.0010 ext. 221
camilia@bookcentre.ca


TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award ($30,000)
Sponsored by TD Bank Group

Day of Signs and Wonders

A Day of Signs and Wonders
Written by Kit Pearson (Victoria, BC)
HarperTrophy Canada
for ages 8-12
“In this fictional story about two historical figures — the young Emily Carr and Victoria’s socialite, Kitty O’Reilly — Pearson delves with astute perception into the qualities and psyches of two very different personalities… Both characters are surprising and convincing, and Pearson’s respect for children’s emotions and intelligence — both her characters’ and her readers’ — is admirably apparent throughout.”

Skeleton Tree

The Skeleton Tree
Written by Iain Lawrence (Gabriola Island, BC)
Tundra Books
for ages 10-14
“Lawrence is well known for his tales of high seas adventure: here he offers a compelling yarn of sea and shipwreck close to his home in the Pacific Northwest… Lawrence weaves a touching tale of struggle and conflict, hope and determination, of family and identity, in a page-turning, breathtaking style… His firsthand knowledge of his setting brings lush, exhilarating vibrancy to this excellent survival story.”

Tokyo Digs a Garden

Tokyo Digs a Garden
Written by Jon-Erik Lappano (Guelph, ON)
Illustrated by Kellen Hatanaka (Toronto, ON)
Groundwood Books
for ages 5-9
“Spare, humorous text accompanied by bright, bold illustrations create a timely modern fable about suburban sprawl and a child’s desire for things to be the way they were when his grandad was a little boy… The charm of Tokyo Digs a Garden lies in its understated text which contrasts perfectly with its colourful and wildly imaginative illustrations.”

Tragic Tale

The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk
Written and illustrated by Jan Thornhill (Havelock, ON)
Groundwood Books
for ages 9-12
The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk is a riveting story about an unlikely hero, a bird, whose fate the reader knows in advance: extinction. Nonetheless, readers will feel compelled to root for its success in the face of adversity… Distinctive and evocative images mesh with strong writing about the lifestyle and obstacles that are a part of daily life for this resourceful bird… This is a book that draws the reader into its world — our world — in a way that’s both haunted and haunting.”

When We Were Alone

When We Were Alone
Written by David Alexander Robertson (Winnipeg, MB)
Illustrated by Julie Flett (Vancouver, BC)
HighWater Press
for ages 6-9
When We Were Alone is an affirmation of human spirit, of truth and reconciliation in equal measures, beautifully captured by Robertson’s simple yet powerful text and Flett’s vibrant illustrations…Powerful words and illustrations combine to tell a beautiful story of a grandmother, after the horrors of residential school, taking back and celebrating her culture and language and ensuring her family feels the same pride.”

JURY MEMBERS: Deirdre Baker, Assistant Professor, University of Toronto, Toronto Star children’s books reviewer, and author; Merle Harris, IBBY Canada Executive Committee member, storyteller and retired elementary school library technician; Dr. Vivian Howard, Associate Professor/Associate Dean (Academic), School of Information Management, Faculty of Management, Dalhousie University; Dr. Dave Jenkinson, Editor, CM: Canadian Review of Materials and Professor Emeritus, Children’s & YA Literature, Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba; Michael Pellegrin, teacher and English Language Arts Specialist, English Montreal School Board.

***

Prix TD de littérature canadienne pour l’enfance et la jeunesse ($30,000)
Sponsored by TD Bank Group

AaahBecedaire

Aaah!bécédaire
Written by Elaine Turgeon (Montreal, QC)
Illustrated by Martin Laliberté (Montreal, QC)
Éditions Druide
for ages 4 and up
“A very original alphabet book which, instead of words or phrases, uses exclamations arranged in alphabetical order… Turgeon and Laliberté present us with a monstrously funny, playful and interactive alphabet book for the great enjoyment of children… A book of great creativity and imagination, with pleasure and laughter guaranteed.”

En voiture

En voiture! L’Amérique en chemin de fer
Written and illustrated by Pascal Blanchet (Montreal, QC)
Éditions de la Pastèque
for ages 8 and up
“Is your luggage ready? Because this first non-fiction book invites you to discover legendary trains and mythical stations that have left a mark on history, through a trip from Montreal to Los Angeles… On each of the fifteen cities on this journey, the author provides anecdotal commentary about the time period as well as other historical facts… Through very elegant illustrations, Blanchet has created an atmosphere inspired by Art Deco.”

Même pas vrai

Même pas vrai
Written by Larry Tremblay (Montreal, QC)
Illustrated by Guillaume Perreault (Gatineau, QC)
Éditions de la Bagnole
for ages 8 and up
“Tremblay presents his first children’s book with Même pas vrai… Well-accompanied by the illustrations of Perreault, we follow the life of Marco, to whom nothing spectacular happens, but which is full of those little things that make up existence… Marco’s reflections on all these events are both funny and deep, light and serious, childish and adult, and the whole forms a unique and savory mixture.”

Niska

Niska
Written by Étienne Poirier (Trois-Rivières, QC)
Éditions du soleil de minuit
for ages 11 and up
“In language accessible to children, Poirier explains the tragedy of residential schools… The tenderness of the writing contrasts with the violence against the culture and identity of the Indigenous characters… The author expresses the main’s characters path from innocence to disenchantment with great subtlety.”

Y'a pas de place chez nous

Y’a pas de place chez nous
Written by Andrée Poulin (Gatineau, QC)
Illustrated by Enzo Lord Mariano (Montreal, QC)
Éditions Québec Amérique
for ages 5 and up
“In this picture book, Poulin offers us a touching narrative about a reality lived by too many children… Y’a pas de place chez nous stages two young refugees from an unknown country seeking a land of asylum. The two brothers, Marwan and Tarek, complete their quest in benevolent territory where they are welcomed and, we hope, treated with dignity… The illustrator, Mariano, plays contrasts oscillating between disturbing dark colours and luminous touches of hope.”

JURY MEMBERS: Noë Crospal, facilitator of children’s literature; Joël-Vincent Cyr, librarian; Rachel DeRoy-Ringuette, children’s literature consultant; Marie France Genest, librarian; Sophie Kurler, librarian.

***

Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award ($20,000)
Sponsored by A. Charles Baillie

Artist and Me

The Artist and Me
Written by Shane Peacock (Cobourg, ON)
Illustrated by Sophie Casson (Montreal, QC)
Owlkids Books
for ages 5-9
“Gripping text and incandescent art combine to spellbind in this story told from the point of view of a man looking back at his childhood memories of bullying an outsider artist…The revelations resonate, and though the artist turns out to be Van Gogh, the emotions and ideas that emerge in this stunning book are completely universal… Glorious rich illustrations capture the essence of southern France in this moving tale.”

Darkest Dark

The Darkest Dark
Written by Chris Hadfield (Toronto, ON) and Kate Fillion (Toronto, ON)
Illustrated by Eric Fan (Toronto, ON) and Terry Fan (Toronto, ON)
Tundra Books
for ages 4-7
“This affecting, multilayered autobiography of a Canadian hero, including his deep early fear of the dark, resonates with outstanding visual flair and textual richness… It brings joyful understanding of the potential for greatness in us all, and celebrates the wonders of breaking boundaries both personal and terrestrial… It will engage adults and children alike.”

I Am Not a Number

I Am Not a Number
Written by Jenny Kay Dupuis (Toronto, ON) and Kathy Kacer (Toronto, ON)
Illustrated by Gillian Newland (Toronto, ON)
Second Story Press
for ages 7 and up
“This powerful memoir relates an important but sad part of Canada’s history… Newland’s sepia-like illustrations help place the recollections of Irene in the past, yet remain loaded with emotion… Readers will find this true story of the residential school experience powerful, thought-provoking and unforgettable…. It witnesses, in unflinching manner, an immense injustice through clear-eyed, eloquent text and brooding art.”

Snow Knows

The Snow Knows
Written by Jennifer McGrath (Moncton, NB)
Illustrated by Josée Bisaillon (St-Hubert, QC)
Nimbus Publishing
for ages 3-8
“This celebration of winter will enchant and inform readers… The use of language is captivating… The exquisite illustrations work beautifully with the rich text… Bisaillon’s detailed and soft illustrations come to life… McGrath has created a vivid portrait of nature in winter that will enthrall.”

We Found a Hat

We Found a Hat
Written and illustrated by Jon Klassen (Los Angeles, CA)
Candlewick Press
for ages 4-8
“Naturalistic dialogue seamlessly blends with elegantly simple and thoroughly expressive art to recreate a complex emotional moment all children experience… Friendship, honesty and creative problem solving make this book a soon-to-be classic as it provides food for thought and plenty to talk about for all ages.”

JURY MEMBERS: Nancy Davidson, former President and National Coordinator of Kids’ Lit Quiz Canada; Maria Martella, owner of Tinlids Inc., a wholesaler of children’s and teen books for schools and libraries; Sheba Meland, children’s publishing and editorial consultant.

***

Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction ($10,000)
Sponsored by the Fleck Family Foundation

Canada Year by Year

Canada Year by Year
Written by Elizabeth MacLeod (Toronto, ON)
Illustrated by Sydney Smith (Toronto, ON)
Kids Can Press
for ages 8-12
“MacLeod has divided the established and unheard-of facts into ten eras covering Canada’s history and influential cultural moments that had global success… Canada Year by Year captivates readers with facts, trivia and quotes, as it covers culture, politics, art and sports… This fascinating book is ideal to pick up and read excerpts or to read from front to back covers.”

Fight to Learn

Fight to Learn: The Struggle to Go to School
Written by Laura Scandiffio (Toronto, ON)
Annick Press
for ages 10-14
“This inspirational book teaches us that the right of education for all is worth fighting for… Tenacity is demonstrated, innovation is celebrated, and kids who have everyday access to education are challenged to become involved in social justice projects supporting education for all… Quotes and photos included enhance the personal stories.”

Level the Playing Field

Level the Playing Field: The Past, Present, and Future of Women’s Pro Sports
Written by Kristina Rutherford (Toronto, ON)
Owlkids Books
for ages 11-14
Level the Playing Field places women athletes at centre stage, highlighting their achievements and providing recognition to the talent they bring to sports… Through historical accounts and interviews with top athletes, Rutherford describes the progress that has been made with women in sports… It is a book which provides optimism to all aspiring young women in sports.”

Tragic Tale

The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk
Written and illustrated by Jan Thornhill (Havelock, ON)
Groundwood Books
for ages 9-12
The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk stands up as both a recounting of a specific interaction between human, place and creature and a cautionary tale of exploitation with many contemporary parallels…The images in this picture book are beautiful and haunting, always pointing to what has been lost… Modern children will have very little difficulty connecting this story to others they know, which makes this book a necessary addition to any school library.”

Water Wow

Water Wow! An Infographic Exploration
Written by Antonia Banyard (Nelson, BC) and Paula Ayer (Vancouver, BC)
Illustrated by Belle Wuthrich (Vancouver, BC)
Annick Press
for ages 8-12
Water Wow! is a captivating book about water… It provides information about water in a fun and easy way for readers to learn about the importance of the one resource that sustains all life… Amid the information and facts, the message of sustainability and conservation is central to the book’s message, providing suggestions on how people can help.”

JURY MEMBERS: Heather Kuipers, owner, Ella Minnow Children’s Bookstore; Emily Moretti, educator, Toronto Catholic District School Board; Sara Spencer, Junior School Librarian, The York School.

***

Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People ($5,000)
Sponsored by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s Bilson Endowment Fund

Every Hidden Thing

Every Hidden Thing
Written by Kenneth Oppel (Toronto, ON)
HarperCollins Publishers
for ages 14 and up
“Oppel’s hauntingly eloquent prose and captivating characters combine to create an epic tale of destructive rivalries and forbidden romance set during the Bone Wars of the late nineteenth century… An alternate version of a Wild West story, the descriptions are cinematic by turns, punctuated with madcap action… Scientific curiosity and secretive romance are at the heart of this compelling and fast-paced tale of exploration, discovery, competition and revenge.”

Freedom's Just Another Word

Freedom’s Just Another Word
Written by Caroline Stellings (Waterdown, ON)
Second Story Press
for ages 13 and up
“Memorable, humorous and ever thoughtful… Stellings has crafted a moving story of identity, empathy and racism… Her novel’s narrator, Easy Merritt, is fiercely determined and delightfully sassy — just the kind of strong female character you want teenage girls to be able to find in young adult literature.”

Heart of a Champion

Heart of a Champion
Written by Ellen Schwartz (Burnaby, BC)
Tundra Books
for ages 9-12
“Schwartz’s novel about the internment of Japanese Canadians during World War II and the fate of the famous Asahi baseball team is simultaneously heart-breaking and uplifting — a testament to the power of hope in the face of injustice… A perfectly paced story using relevant settings and real, flawed characters who reveal feelings of injustice, depression, resilience and ultimately, hope.”

Mark of the Plague

The Mark of the Plague
(Blackthorn Key, Book 2)
Written by Kevin Sands (London, ON)
Aladdin
for ages 10-14
“Emotionally-charged and action-packed, The Mark of the Plague reminds us of the dangers of putting profit before people…An exceptional story in every way… It will strike a chord with readers for its original plot, its use of puzzles, tricks and distortion of the truth, and it’s perfectly drawn and memorable characters… The blend of alchemy and intrigue enrich and enliven the historical genre.”

When Morning Comes

When Morning Comes
Written by Arushi Raina (Vancouver, BC)
Tradewind Books
for ages 14 and up
Explosively powerful and agonizingly raw, the novel highlights the harsh realities of life in apartheid South Africa and is a timely reminder of the sacrifices involved in deconstructing an unjust social order… The stakes are high, the four voices powerful and committed, and the power of youth to effect political change is exposed in this tense, and often violent novel… The representations of different cultural groups are nuanced and complex, without resorting to stereotypes… An important story.

JURY MEMBERS: Shannon Babcock, Project Coordinator, Quebec Reading Connection, and Regional Councillor Quebec, IBBY Canada; Sally Bender, retired teacher-librarian and blogger at Sal’s Fiction Addiction; Roseanne Gauthier, Youth Services Librarian, PEI Public Library Service; Gail de Vos (chair), author, storyteller and Professor, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Alberta.

***

John Spray Mystery Award ($5,000)
Sponsored by John Spray

Dark Missions of Edgar Brimm

The Dark Missions of Edgar Brim
(The Dark Missions of Edgar Brim, Book 1)
Written by Shane Peacock (Cobourg, ON)
Tundra Books
for ages 12 and up
The Dark Missions of Edgar Brim is a fantastical murder mystery filled with fantastical creatures, mystery and intrigue.… Characters are skilfully developed and play their roles to perfection… Peacock delivers a daring thriller that draws the reader into a world that is both familiar and yet mystical… Be sure to read with the lights on.”

Howard Wallace PI

Howard Wallace, P.I.
Written by Casey Lyall (Strathroy, ON)
Sterling Children’s Books
for ages 8-12
“A great introduction to film noir, with a voice that carries you to another time period entirely… Laced with quirky characters and related moments, Howard Wallace P.I. is perfect for reading by flashlight or while tucked in the corner of a treehouse… A humorous, clever, warm-hearted middle grade story that makes a terrific introduction to the mystery genre for any young reader.

Road to Ever After

The Road to Ever After
Written by Moira Young (Bath, UK)
Doubleday Canada
for ages 10-14
“Full of fantasy and the supernatural, with plenty of twists along the way to keep readers turning pages, The Road to Ever After is a meaningful story about what it means to be alive… Young’s writing is lyrical and poetic and her characterization of the wind is enchanting… Readers are given just enough hints to solve the mystery mere moments before the protagonist.”

Shooter

Shooter
Written by Caroline Pignat (Kanata, ON)
Razorbill Canada
for ages 13 and up
“Pignat’s Shooter is a dramatic and gripping novel told through a series of interconnected voices that lend an authenticity to the narrative… As the mystery unfolds, the reader is lead through many cliffhanging moments with a “can’t put it down” climax leaving the reader holding their breath through the last pages.”

Sophie Quire and the Last Storyguard

Sophie Quire and the Last Storyguard
(The Continuing Adventures of Peter Nimble, Book 2)
Written by Jonathan Auxier (Pittsburgh, PA)
Puffin Canada
for ages 10-13
“A thrilling adventure read with lots of delightful twists… Auxier creates a very believable fantasy world filled with evil villains and fantastical creatures that will intrigue and excite young readers… Playing with the theme of courage in the face of censorship, this novel uses the power of books and reading to weave a beautiful and memorable story.”

JURY MEMBERS: Roxanne Deans, Director of Inventory and Outreach, The Children’s Book Bank, Co-Founder of StoryMobs, and former bookstore owner; Sandra O’Brien, Editor, Canadian Children’s Book News, and former teacher; Ashley Pamenter, Coordinator of Programming, Girl Guides of Canada, and former elementary school teacher.

***

Amy Mathers Teen Book Award ($5,000)
Sponsored by Sylvan Learning

Exit, Pursued by a Bear

Exit, Pursued by a Bear
Written by E.K. Johnston (Stratford, ON)
Dutton Books
for ages 14 and up
“Johnston has created an empowering story about the aftermath of a sexual assault… Hermione is strong and fearless, and she refuses to allow the events of one horrible night to consume her… Thought-provoking. Heart-breaking. Unforgettable. Inspiring. Necessary.”

Girl Mans Up

Girl Mans Up
Written by M-E Girard (Oshawa, ON)
HarperCollins Publishers
for ages 14 and up
Girl Mans Up is a powerful story about one girl’s struggle to find her identity while facing challenges from her immigrant parents, and her peers… Beautifully written, this novel invokes breathtaking emotions through a main character who has a distinct and authentic voice.”

Julia Vanishes

Julia Vanishes
Written by Catherine Egan (New Haven, CT)
Doubleday Canada
for ages 13 and up
Egan has built a world that is not only fully realised but surprises at every turn, leaving you with an immersive and thought-provoking read… Rich world-building and well-developed characters make this an unforgettable story that will have readers clamouring for a sequel.”

Shooter

Shooter
Written by Caroline Pignat (Kanata, ON)
Razorbill Canada
for ages 13 and up
“Pignat tells an incredible story through the eyes of five very different characters who have to face a situation no one could ever be prepared for… The entire story takes place over the course of one nail-biting hour, and a countdown timer at the beginning of each chapter ramps up the tension… The gripping storyline makes this impossible to put down.”

With Malice

With Malice
Written by Eileen Cook (North Vancouver, BC)
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
for ages 13 and up
“With Malice is brilliantly written and takes the reader on a ride that is as unexpected as it is captivating… The unique format keeps the reader glued to the page, certain their opinion is the right one, only to learn that things may not be as they seem.”

JURY MEMBERS: Penny Chaiko, teacher-librarian, Nantyr Shores Secondary School; Tina Everitt, Category Manager for Teen & Romance, Indigo Books & Music; Rachel Seigel, freelance author and Adult Fiction Specialist, Library Services Centre.

***

Prix Harry Black de l’album jeunesse ($5,000)
Sponsored by Mary Macchiusi

Au-dela de la forêt

Au-delà de la forêt
Written by Nadine Robert (Varennes, QC)
Illustrated by Gérard DuBois (St-Lambert, QC)
Comme des géants
for ages 5 and up
“Robert’s somber writing combined with the old-fashioned charm of DuBois’ grand illustrations makes this story of determination and solidarity a remarkable work… Text and illustrations emphasize the tender complicity between son and father… Inspires readers to reflect on the fundamental and timeless values of life in society.”

Azadah

Azadah
Written and illustrated by Jacques Goldstyn (Town of Mount-Royal, QC)
Éditions de la Pastèque
for ages 6 and up
“Azadah is a little girl who lives in Afghanistan and befriends a Western photographer on mission in her country… Revolted by the conditions imposed on her, she dreams of literature, films and adventures in the outside world… Goldstyn tells an engaging story about hopes and dreams with a few words, a lively pencil and his trademark luminous colours.”

Je ne suis pas ta maman

Je ne suis pas ta maman
Written and illustrated by Marianne Dubuc (Montreal, QC)
Comme des géants
for ages 4 and up
“A story about adoption and acceptance of differences that unravels delicately over the pages… A well-constructed narrative, tender and harsh at the same time… It immerses us magnificently into the universe of the characters, while highlighting their environment… The story is carried strongly by Dubuc’s finely-constructed illustrations.”

N'importe quoi

N’importe quoi!
Written and illustrated by Élise Gravel (Montreal, QC)
Éditions Les 400 coups
for ages 5 and up
“At once funny, sometimes intimate, and refreshingly unique… Gravel invites her readers to discover what she is doing with her time when she is not working on a children’s book project… An encouragement of creativity, perseverance and acceptance that not everything has to be perfect.”

Y'a pas de place chez nous

Y’a pas de place chez nous
Written by Andrée Poulin (Gatineau, QC)
Illustrated by Enzo Lord Mariano (Montreal, QC)
Éditions Québec Amérique
for ages 5 and up
“With Y’a pas de place chez nous, the refugee issue is tackled head on, but with great sensitivity… Poulin delivers a striking, engaging text with a splendid rhythm that deals with a sadly topical subject… The illustrations subtly evoke the harshness of the journey for the passengers of this boat of refugees in search of a land of welcome…”

JURY MEMBERS: Danièle Courchesne, teacher; Marie Dupin de Saint-André, Editor-in-Chief, Le Pollen; Pascale Grenier, librarian, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec.

 


 

For more information about these awards, please visit www.bookcentre.ca/programs/awards/

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2016 Lane Anderson Awards Nominees Announced

The finalists of the 2016 Lane Anderson Awards for Excellence in Canadian Science Writing were announced yesterday. The winners will be revealed in September. Visit laneandersonaward.ca for more information.

Young Readers

Monster Science: Could Monsters Survive (and Thrive) in the Real World?
Written by Helaine Becker and Phil McAndrew
Kids Can Press

5 Giraffes
Written by Anne Innis Dagg
Fitzhenry & Whiteside

Inside Your Insides: Guide to the Microbes That Call You Home
Written by Claire Eamer and illustrated by Marie-Eve Tremblay
Kids Can Press

Adult Readers

At Sea With the Marine Birds of the Raincoast
Written by Caroline Fox
Rocky Mountain Books

North America in the Anthropocene
Written by Robert William Sandford
Rocky Mountain Books

Bad Singer
Written by Tim Falconer
House of Anansi

100 Million Years of Food
Written by Stephen Le
Harper Collins